What are your best practices or examples for successfully integrating conflict sensitivity into peacebuilding programs or other sectoral programming?

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    • ConnexUs & USAID are hosting Conflict Sensitivity & Integration: How Peacebuilders Can Influence Development Outcomes, an online crowdsourced knowledge-sharing campaign, through the end of 2022.

      You’re invited to participate however you can from wherever you are. One way that you can contribute is by responding to this question to both share with and learn from ConnexUs’ global community:

      What are your best practices or examples for successfully integrating conflict sensitivity into peacebuilding programs or other sectoral programming?

      We look forward to your responses!

    • Hi All,

      What I would suggest coming from my Women’s Rights Organization background is to :

      1. use gender sensitive conflict analysis tools to understand how conflicts affects women and girls differently.

      2. let your programming or interventions speak to the 4 pillars of WPS Agenda

      3. Create a situation room for Early conflict warning system and to gather useful data

      4. Inclusivity should be prioritized

       

       

      • Thank you for sharing your recommendations! Where can we learn more about your organization? I’d love to read more

    • Conflict sensitivity can be incorporated along the full project cycle. This includes the design phase with conflict analysis and inclusivity (as Uduak mentioned) as well as conflict-aware implementation, monitoring, evaluation, and learning (MEL) processes that not only seek to avoid during harm in the way information is collected and shared (for example), but also maximizes peacebuilding opportunities by seeing MEL as *intervention* rather than an add-on process. Also similar to Uduak, optimizing monitoring to serve as an early warning systems is also helpful, despite most MEL money being reserved for evaluations. Another tool I have used is crafting personas to represent the groups of people touched by/involved in an intervention. This helps you think through what various actions might mean for that group as well as how they can most effectively be involved.

      • Ah, very interesting! Have you put out any learning resources on crafting personas? It sounds like a really helpful practice/tool

        • Hi Zander. We will be including some information on crafting personas in the forthcoming Environmental Peacebuilding M&E Toolkit! It should be ready early next year. A good way to stay up-to-date is through the Environmental Peacebuilding Association and its M&E Interest Group.

    • Changes in a fragile context are unexpected. In response and to regulary adapt program strategies (minimizing risks and maximizing opportunities for peace), we have put in place a simple and practical checklist to monitor the level of conflict sensitivity in our cross cutting programs in Sahel region. All the teams take part in this follow-up. This good practice allows us to be effective in monitoring conflict dynamics and be also proactive in programmatic adaptations without harming.

      • Are these checklists publicly available? Sounds like a great practice!

        • Hi Amanda.

          Yes we can discuss it separately, it’s a checklist that we can share but must be presented for its appropriation. There are score levels per question which must be understood for its application.

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